Fall Jacket: Quilted

Brrrr! It’s a bit chilly on this first day of October as I sit here writing this, but it is the morning, and I know that it will likely warm up throughout the day especially as the sun comes out. Like I talked about in my last post though, these are the weather days that confuse my dressing habits. It’s cold in the shade and warm in the sun…cold in the morning, warm during the day, and cold at night…howww are you possibly supposed to stay comfortable without changing 100 times throughout the day??

Every year, I also find myself facing these issues with outerwear. And I admit, I often classify my multiple jackets and coats based on what temperature they’re most appropriate for: “40 degrees coat”…”50-60’s appropriate”…etc. Sounds silly, but honestly it helps to know what coat or jacket is the one I’ll be most comfortable in.

I will say, I have a lot that land on either end of the spectrum, and not many that are appropriate for those in between weather extremities—like for October weather in Ohio. That is why I made this quilted jacket. It’s pretty perfect for Fall. It’s really cozy for this chillier weather, but not super hot in the sun.

 

 

Outfit details:

Coat: If you like, request custom here ;) Necklace: made by me, find others like it here; Jeans: Gap; Shoes: Clarks Desert Boots; Purse: J.W. Hulme; Sunglasses: Jessica Simpson

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Old Movie Inspired

Ask my husband, and he’ll tell you that almost every time we watch an old movie on TCM, I’m running over to the TV with my phone so I can get a picture of a costume that I find inspiring.

I was totally inspired for this next one…by Ann Miller in Two Tickets to Broadway. I used the same pattern  (M7513) as I did for the jacket in this post. And again, I also did some dyeing for it. Instead of marbling though, I did a full dunk of color. I used RIT dye again, and I did a little bit of color mixing (thanks to RIT’s website full of dye recipes) to achieve this periwinkle hue. Here’s how it came out:

 

It took a little searching to find some appliques I thought would work the best. I finally decided on these from Mood fabrics. They ended up giving just the look I was hoping for.

Leather look pants helped with that edgy aesthetic I was going for ;)

The trim I used was a combination of a normal braid trim with faux leather.

I contemplated making the collar the same periwinkle shade, but ultimately thought it would do well as a contrast piece.

Outfit details:

Belt: BCBGeneration (many years ago); Leather look pants from H&M (last year); Shoes: hand-me-down from a friend!

Marbled Shibori

On to the next one…

Okay, so my most current make: This marbled shibori jacket…is probably my newest favorite. I am totally in love with this one.

I won’t lie to you…the process included a couple tribulations along the way, or at least what I thought might be tribulations that actually turned out to be moments of delight; like the dye I used seemed a bit too blue when I first took it out but as it dried turned to the shade of grey I had hoped it would…and I didn’t have enough gold silk (again, using up remnants!) to make the collar or cuffs gold on both sides. But! I did have enough of the pale blue lining leftover, and so the underside of both, respectively, became blue.

Honestly, the result of this jacket reminded me of a more modern version of an 1800’s tailcoat. I used a McCall’s pattern (#m7513) and the tried and true Rit dye. My intention was to shibori dye in a way that looked more marbled–hence the use of grey dye. Since grey is a less vibrant color, I thought the shibori wouldn’t appear as obvious. And it didn’t, which is exactly what I was hoping for.

 

I actually re-made these shoes many years ago. They were a basic heel that I wanted to spruce up a bit. They have a total Marie Antoinette vibe–which works perfectly with my modern looking tailcoat, reminiscent of *around* the same time period. ;)

Luckily, I had just enough gold buttons stashed away to use as closures…crisis averted. Phew ;)

I also wanted to use gold for the facings so that the entire collar would be gold, but alas–not enough gold!

 

 

Outfit details: Jeans from Gap; Shoes-Jessica Simpson heels that I re-made; Clutch from Anthropologie (No longer available); earrings from Target very long ago.

Metallic Jacket: Handmade

I found this metallic printed fabric hidden away in my little fabric stash. It’s an interesting woven fabric, kind of looks like it should mimic a hyde, but with silver metallic splashes allover. It’s really quite unique looking. There was maybe only a yard and a half or two and to be honest, at first I thought maybe I could reupholster a chair seat, but then decided I would rather make this jacket and try to use up the remainder of the silver velvet I had, too.

That said, this baby is one of it’s kind. I do not have any fabric leftover to make another. And wouldn’t it just look great for a festive holiday party??

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No outside pockets…but I’ve got you covered with one on the inside as a great place to stash your phone and or lip balm ;)

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Did I mention there are velvet under-sleeves, too? Metallics + Velvet is the perfect winter jacket combination.

Outfit details:

Jacket, one and only…here; Black tuxedo tail tee, Jessica Simpson; Gap jeans; Clutch, H&M (no longer available); DSW t-straps, similar here.

 

Complete with Collar and Cuffs

There’s just something about French cuff sleeves that draw me in with star-gazed eyes. They just scream sophisticated when they are on a jacket.

In this post, I’ve made this 1950’s inspired jacket that is probably one of my favorites to date. Here’s its story:

I made the bodice from a Vogue pattern (#8355) but changed the sleeves so they were French cuffs. I gave it a first go-around probably more than 5 years ago now (!), and that first version did not turn out the best because I was not 100% into it. I stopped my process half-way through only to come back to it a few years later. That entire scenario, in my experience, is never a winner. And after all these years of sewing, making and creating, I believe I finally understand my own creative process…and a big part of it is that it does not serve me well to stop half-way through something I am doing. I absolutely need to see it through from start to finish. Who’s with me?

So, a few months ago I decided I’d give this jacket another go. And this time, I was going to start it and finish it completely within a reasonable time-frame. Well, that I did. Along the way, I had to alter the pattern a bit for size–because of course, this pattern is out of print–and in doing that I was terribly nervous that the result was going to be much too tiny for me. But let’s be real, we designers and sewers know that about 75% of sewing involves some kind of troubleshooting because rarely does anything actually turn out the way we imagine.

This jacket pattern called for buttons and buttonholes, which there was absolutely no way that would be happening for my round 2 jacket if I wanted to wear it the way it was intended. My fix was to use a number of hook and eye clasps, because that way I had just enough room for it to fit like a glove. After the clasps were on, the jacket still looked a little incomplete to me, so I took some leftover lining and made some covered buttons (decorative only) to bring it all together. Ultimately, I’m happy I stuck it through this time around because it was totally worth it.

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This jacket is available as custom-order only via Etsy. Varying colors available!

Outfit details:

Jacket, Etsy shop; Skirt from Asos, similar here; Clutch from Target clearance; Shoes from DSW, similar here